Success

It’s measured in moments. Tiny increments of achievement, over time add up to significant progress. Sometimes you notice them. Once in a while, someone else notices. Most often, they go unrecognized in the daily grind of life, when you struggle at the keyboard to finish a scene, to edit what you wrote yesterday, to elevate the content from the mundane and derivative to something fresh and captivating.

Suddenly, one day, you’ve arrived at a milestone. You didn’t see it or hear it coming, but you felt it gathering. Maybe you weren’t sure what it was, exactly, but you knew things were shifting, you were getting somewhere. In moments of doubt, you wondered if it was your imagination. There’s only one thing to do. Keep writing.

It’s been a few years now, and you are sending out an application, just like the rest of the world of aspiring screenwriters. That most coveted prize of the ABC/Disney Fellowship dangles before you. You know you’re a serious candidate, that you’d be an asset to the staff table, but hardly dare to hope that anyone else will recognize that. There are many gifted people out there. How do you stand out from the crowd?

So, you call on your most trusted teacher/advisor, and ask him to take another look at your spec script, even though he’s already evaluated it several times. And just to be sure, get a fresh pair of eyes to look it over, too. They tell you it’s good, although those words are not usually spoken in the context of the evaluation. Aside from a few suggestions of small edits, they have no notes for me. In fact, they both say they like it better than the show it’s based on. And in that moment you know, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that you can really do it. You can achieve your dream and write for TV.

Now you are ready, and you dare to ask for the letters of recommendation you need to include with the application. It seems incredibly audacious, but you ask the friend in the writers’ room who’s too busy to eat if she’ll take a look at your script and write a recommendation. Since she knows how hard you work, and how much you want it, and also because she’s incredibly nice, she says she’ll be honored. You’ve already received another letter from your first teacher, an award-winning filmmaker. You really admire his work, and the praise in the letter is dazzling. He writes as though you are his equal.

You’re calm. Even though you’ve worked years for this recognition, you didn’t expect it. You know you’re ready to move on to the next level. There’s no mania, none of the adrenalin that accompanies forcing the way through things you just have to have. Your brain buzzes with hope and something else. That feeling that you’ve earned your seat and that it’s coming. Maybe you’ll win the fellowship and maybe you won’t, but you deserve it.

That moment is real success. And no achievement will ever feel better.

Published by

karenlovestv

I'm a recent graduate with an MFA in Writing and Producing Television. I'm also a mom with two kids and a hubby, a feminist and equal rights advocate. Lately, I've been obsessed with minimalism and I'm addicted to self-improvement

2 thoughts on “Success”

  1. The private journey of the artist into his art is his only reality. Opinions and reactions of others to his art is out of his control. Only the creator of art is patient with the process of his creation, a baby born into the real world of breathing, eating and, ultimately, independence. The baby cries in the night and must be comforted, diapers must be changed, skinned knees must be doctored, and tears must be patted dry. No one but a parent will see that a child is not neglected or traumatized. No one else will care. The successes and failures of rearing an artistic creation are also private. The outside world only sees the finished product. Worldly success for a child is out of the hands of the parent once the child is an adult, and without the years of private successes and failures, without the parent’s ceaseless nurturing, the child has no chance of getting these things from anyone else. I think that no matter how successful we become, we should remember it is our creation that is successful – not us. Our success came quietly and without fanfare in those distant hours of labor. Woody Guthrie said, “The gettin’s in the goin’.'”

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