Fellowship Applications: What Not to Do

Last year, around June 8, I decided to enter the competition for NBC/Universal Writers on the Verge. I didn’t have a completed spec, or even a half-completed spec, but felt that if I worked hard on it, I could get it in time for the June 29th deadline. I decided to write a Vampire Diaries Spec, because I had been watching it with my teenage daughter and I thought it was fun and it fit the specifications of being popular, renewed and in its first three seasons.

Actually, Season two had just wrapped up, and that gave me about forty-four episodes to study, most of which I had seen. The first thing I needed to do was to find some scripts to see how the show was formatted and get a feel for the style of the writing. As it turned out, CW scripts are hard to come by, and I was only able to get my hands on the pilot. What I couldn’t learn from that, I had to make up or glean from the show.

For the next three weeks I worked very hard to get the script together, 8 to 12 hours a day. I hadn’t done a spec script and was still learning how TV story lines intertwined. What I ended up with was a polished first draft, but a first draft nonetheless. Being an egomaniacal newbie writer, I sent off the script, convinced that even in its unfinished state, my natural talent would shine through – Hah! On the day it was due, I slaved away on my computer until the last possible moment, finishing up the essay questions and filling out the application. Of course I never heard from them.

This year I’m doing somewhat better. Having spent the rest of the summer rewriting my spec, I sent it off to a contest in which it placed in the quarterfinals. That alerted me that another draft was needed. I took the time to rework it, cut it down considerably, and through the process of several evaluations over the life of the script, I got it close to the best it could be.

This year, I have already applied to Disney and WB. Thankfully, I learned my lesson and had my essays written, reviewed and rewritten well in advance. The actual preparation of the applications took much longer than I anticipated, so I was very happy to have given myself that extra time. Weeks before the deadline, I asked some friends in the industry for letters of recommendation, which they agreed to do. I ended up with three glowing letters to choose two from, and felt that the application I sent off would be seriously considered. I had done all I could do.

I’d say the most important lesson I’ve learned is that I never want to show anyone work that is sub-par. Second, another set of eyes will always see something I’ve missed, so it makes a lot of sense to have my work evaluated by a trusted advisor. Third, everything takes longer than I think it will, so I have to leave extra time to do it right.

That’s what I’ve learned to date about applying for Fellowships and Workshops. If you have any insight to the process, I’d love to hear about it.

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karenlovestv

I'm a recent graduate with an MFA in Writing and Producing Television. I'm also a mom with two kids and a hubby, a feminist and equal rights advocate. Lately, I've been obsessed with minimalism and I'm addicted to self-improvement

One thought on “Fellowship Applications: What Not to Do”

  1. It seems to me like this is a mistake most amateur writers make. Sending off an unfinished script whilst holding onto that tiny little hope of ‘They’ll see the potential in it!’ I’m pretty much on the same boat as you, where last year I sent in an *incomplete first draft* of a pilot for an original series. I don’t know what I was thinking. I worked on it for one day. Granted, I would never have applied if there was an application fee. This one didn’t, although it was a well-known initiative in conjunction with Kudos, which is a major production company in the UK. This year, I’m preparing well in advance and I’ve learned enough that I won’t even show my friends anything before a second draft much less submit it anywhere. But I think it was a good experience, because you need to make mistakes in screenwriting. Like Thomas Edison said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

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